Time and cost savings for 39-metre long drag conveyor shipment

Why RoRo’s the winning solution when it comes to shipping lengthy products in one go.

Intrame drag conveyor in Santander

How do you transport a 39-metre long drag conveyor across the Atlantic in one piece?

That’s the challenge that faced Spanish manufacturing company Intrame when looking for ocean transportation options for its valuable shipment, which also included other parts of a dismantled asphalt plant.

Due to the dimensions involved, Intrame needed a best-in-class carrier that could load a large quantity of oversized products safely while maintaining high quality standards.

The solution was WW Ocean’s RoRo service, which enabled the lengthy conveyor and other components to be loaded and transported from the Port of Santander in Spain to Baltimore in the US, fully constructed.

Safety first with RoRo

Thanks to the minimal lifting involved, RoRo is a safe way to transport oversized breakbulk such as drag conveyors. Rolling handling equipment means products can smoothly be rolled onboard.

In this instance, multi-purpose bogies, placed on top of two 40ft roll trailers, were attached to both ends of the conveyor and simultaneously pushed and pulled by two tug masters to gently manoeuvre the product onto the vessel.

Intrame drag conveyor on handling equipment

Multi-purpose bogies, placed on top of two 40ft roll trailers, were attached to both ends of the conveyor to roll the product onto the vessel.

Intrame drag conveyor being loaded into the vessel

Due to the sizeable length of the conveyor, great care had to be taken to consider the angle of the vessel’s ramp.

Intrame drag conveyor in the vessel

A slow and considered approach was critical to fit the conveyor into its assigned space on the vessel.

The combined length of the manoeuvre – including the product itself, the roll trailers and tug masters – measured in at 65 metres. Due to this sizeable length, great care had to be taken to consider the angle of the vessel’s ramp, and to try to keep the product as flat as possible. The final part of the manoeuvre to fit the conveyor into its assigned space on the ship was particularly challenging given the narrow dimensions involved – so a slow and considered approach was critical.

To devise the right handling solution, the WW Ocean team worked closely with the engineers at Intrame to propose equipment and lashing solutions.

Ahead of the conveyor’s departure from the port of Santander, WW Ocean also ran a test-drive to practice the complex handling procedure.

Time and cost savings

Transporting the drag conveyor fully assembled generated time and cost savings for Intrame and ensured that high quality standards were maintained.

“Shipping dismantled products and then assembling them at the final destination causes delays and incurs costs as that requires sending a construction team to oversee the mantling process,” explains WW Ocean’s sales representative Olga Romero. “The quality is also of a higher standard when a product is factory assembled rather than being assembled on-site.

“By working closely with the customer, our solution facilitates and accelerates assembly of the entire asphalt plant on arrival in the US and ensures Intrame’s equipment is up and running as swiftly as possible.”

Intrame

Intrame is a family-owned Spanish company, with more than 50 years’ experience of designing and manufacturing asphalt and concrete plants, which are exported to five continents. It produces both batch and continuous type asphalt plants, and concrete plants with either twin shaft horizontal mixers or tilting drum mixers, as well as a range of plant accessories for construction projects around the world.

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